Tag Archives: Wilbur Snyder

Chargers’ Ladd Debut March 26

Chicago Defender – March 19-25, 1966

Ernie Ladd, giant Negro defensive tackle in pro football, will make his Chicago debut in wrestling March 26 when he meets Bulldog Plechas in the Amphitheatre, 43rd and Halstead Sts. Continue reading

4 Girls Featured On Stadium Mat Card

The Washington Afro-American – June 8, 1957

BABS WINGO

BABS WINGO

Fourteen of the world’s greatest wrestling stars, including four outstanding girl athletes, will see action on the big outdoor show which features undefeated Ricki Starr and the amazing Antonino Rocca at Griffith Stadium Monday night. Continue reading

Bruiser Hurls Chair At Eric; Halt Mat Bout

Chicago Tribune – October 18, 1958

Boris and Nicoli Volkoff held Verne Gagne and Edouard Carpentier to a draw in the featured tag match in the wrestling show Friday night in the Amphitheater in the stock yards. But it was a mere warmup for what followed. Continue reading

Mat Men Who Know Best, Go Pressed

Chicago Tribune – April 7, 1956
By Cooper Rollow

With men who know wrestling best, it’s the body press, 4 to 3.

There are many ways of winning on the professional mat, most of them suspect in one way or another. But the true and tried body press – mayhem in a lethal, but legal, dose – won the popularity test last night in the International Amphitheater. Continue reading

Thesz, Snyder Meet Tonight On Mat Card

Chicago Tribune – July 6, 1956
By Frank Mastro

The sixth wrestling show of the year will be held in International Amphitheater tonight, headed by Lou Thesz and Wilbur Snyder, and attended by an expected 8,000. The bout is booked for two of three falls with a one-hour time limit. Continue reading

Pepper Gomez Girds For Lou Thesz

Houston Chronicle – August 21, 1955

Pepper Gomez, one of the greatest Texas champions wrestling has had, gets a chance at the world’s heavyweight title when he meets Louis Thesz in the most important main event of the year at the City Auditorium on Friday night.

Continue reading

Snyder, Thesz Battle To Draw Before 8,853

Chicago Tribune – July 7, 1956
By Frank Mastro

Wilbur Snyder, national television wrestling champion, and Lou Thesz, former National Wrestling Alliance titleholder, battled to a one-hour draw last night in the International Amphitheater. Continue reading

Snyder Beats Schmidt, And 7,132 Cheer

Chicago Tribune – June 2, 1956

Wilbur Snyder retained his national television wrestling title last night in International Amphitheater much to the delight of 7,132 spectators who saw him win two of three falls from Hans Schmidt of Montreal. Continue reading

Newest Mat Rage Bows At Olympic

The California Eagle – June 13, 1963

Freddie Blassie and The Destroyer, two of wrestling biggest attractions, will have to share honors with the sensational Bearcat Wright night at the Olympic Auditorium. Continue reading

Hutton Is Carried Out But Retains His Title

Globe & Mail – August 15, 1958
By Rex MacLeod

Dick Hutton was freighted out of Maple Leaf Gardens ring on a stretcher last night – still the recumbent champeen of the National Wrestling Alliance and a few allied outposts.

Champeens, as a rule, don’t leave the ring in this manner, a point which was argued forcibly by challenger Lou Thesz, who had hopes of regaining the title he had held for many years.

But referee Bert Maxwell, a portly chappie who is devoid of sentiment, declined to indulge in any bandinage. He disqualified Thesz after 24 minutes and two seconds of highly skillful grappling.

Naturally there was an uproar among the crowd of 6,002. Many thought that Thesz had won legitimately. A few expressed concern about the motionless Hutton and a few others thought that Maxwell had lost a few more marbles.

The end, to coin a phrase, came unexpectedly although Thesz, seemingly enraged by Maxwell’s peculiar concept of justice, had been growing more angry by the second. And when Thesz gets angry he grows muscles on his muscles.

In one moment of fury he hurled Hutton, a mere 250 pounds, out of the ring to the cement floor. Hutton, the fool, tried to climb back into the ring but Thesz drop-kicked him back to the cement.

Hutton arose groggily and once more tried to get back. Again Thesz went airborne to launch a drop kick but this time Maxwell somehow got in the prohibited area. He took the full impact of Thesz’ drop kick on one of his chins and fell flopping like a beached porpoise on the ring apron.

Hutton, meanwhile, had climbed wearily through the ropes, a reckless manoeuver. Thesz hoisted him aloft, aimed carefully and slammed him all over the canvas.

Thesz was perched on the comatose Hutton when Maxwell reeled back into the ring and clapped Thesz on the back. Numerous fans thought that Maxwell was proclaiming Thesz the winner. There was some jubilation but it was short-lived. Maxwell was merely informing everyone that Thesz had been disqualified.

Naturally Thesz protested. He gesticulated wildly, even threatened to punch Maxwell. He pleaded that he had not kicked Maxwell intentionally but the referee ignored him.

Hutton was examined briefly in the ring by a doctor before he was borne away to the dressing room. It was announced later that he did not suffer any ill effects.

The gigantic Miller brothers, Ed and Bill, won their tag team match in the semi-final by defeating Athol Layton and George Pencheff. Ed Miller subdued Pencheff with an expanding back-breaker at 23:42. Seconds before the playful Millers had played wishbone with the exhausted Pencheff.

In other exhibitions of skill and science Tarzan Tourville dispatched Tiger Tasker with a series of drop kicks, fancy Frenchy Vignal stopped Al Korman with an airplane spin and spread, and Wilbur Snyder won by disqualification over Dan Miller, younger member of the rowdy clan.