Tag Archives: Man Mountain Dean

Garibaldi And Lopez Back Feature

Los Angeles Herald-Express – July 14, 1937
By E.W. Krauch

Everything but mayhem is expected to go tonight at the Olympic when Sandor Szabo, the handsome Hungarian, reaches out for Man Mountain Dean, the Hell’s Kitchen Hillbilly, in their three-fall finish match. Continue reading

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Dean Injured As He Falls Before Szabo

Los Angeles Herald-Express – July 15, 1937
By E.W. Krauch

Man Mountain Dean, giant Georgia hillbilly wrestler, wasn’t kiddin’ in the least last night at the Olympic Auditorium as he lay on the canvas moaning:

“My leg, my leg! It’s broken!”

Today Dean, with his left leg in a cast, was in Georgia Street Receiving Hospital. Continue reading

Detton Still Rules Roost As Heavy Mat Champion

Los Angeles Herald-Express – December 24, 1936
By E.W. Krauch

The old noggin — brainwork to youse — counts a lot in this hectic business of two guys trying to tie each other into torturing knots.

Dean Detton, the world’s heavyweight wrestling champion, gave a very excellent exhibition of this noggin business last night at the Olympic auditorium as he successfully defending his title by defeating Sandor Szabo, the best looking gent in the industry, in straight falls. Continue reading

On The Hoof

Saturday Evening Post – December 14, 1935
By Milton MacKaye

The standing of wrestling as a profit-making enterprise has received little attention in the economic journals, and even those publications devoted to the fevers of sport have been niggardly in space and headlines. There has been a general tendency to regard wrestling as a sort of little country cousin of the opulent boxing profession, a rude and primitive trial of strength persisting feebly in the backwoods sections, but destined ultimately to become as extinct as the broadsword. As a public spectacle, it has been rated just ahead of long-distance walking contests and the hop, skip, and jump, and considerably behind the breath-taking thrills and romance of puss-in-the-corner and the potato race. Continue reading

Lewis Pins Man Mountain

Lockport Union-Sun and Journal – December 21, 1935

ST. LOUIS, Dec. 21 (AP) – (Strangler) Lewis, 250, former world champion, won a decision over “Man Mountain” Dean, 317 Thursday evening when the bewhiskered behemoth was counted out outside the ring. The bout lasted 7 minutes, 27 seconds.

Man Mountain Dean, 63, Dies Of Heart Attack

United Press – May 29, 1953

NORCROSS, Ga. – Frank S. Leavitt, huge, colorful, onetime wrestler known as “Man Mountain Dean,” died at his Georgia country home today of a heart attack. He was 63.

The bearded giant who pioneered the current vaudeville type of wrestling had not been ill. His wife, Doris, was with him when he died. Continue reading

Ali Baba In Mat Triumph

Los Angeles Times – June 23, 1938
By Jack Singer

Just what effect it is likely to have on the national debt, the European crisis and the 1940 presidential election is not yet apparent but a rassler actually knocked himself out by landing on his head last night. Continue reading

Riot Averted As Savoldi Pins Terror

Washington Post – November 25, 1938
By Lewis F. Atchison

Ham, rather than the customary gobbler, was the holiday offering at Turner’s Arena last night when a 305-pound specimen, the Golden Terror, succumbed to a series of punishing dropkicks authored by swarthy Joe Savoldi. Continue reading

Man Mountain Dean Dumps Pinto

Chicago Tribune – January 3, 1939

Man Mountain Dean won his wrestling exhibition with Stanley Pinto in Cicero Stadium yesterday afternoon when Pinto was counted out by referee Earl Mollihan after 9 minutes and 15 seconds. Continue reading

Mat Ranks In New Mixup; Dean Wins

Los Angeles Herald-Express – July 8, 1937
By E.W. Krauch

Olympic Auditorium wrestling is in another giant mixup this fair summer day.

In fact, the “Grunt and Groan” boys, the fans and even the officials of the California Athletic Commission, are more scrambled over ideas after what happened during last night’s main event between Man Mountain Dean and Sandor Szabo than a couple of eggs in an omelette. Continue reading