Tag Archives: Whipper Watson

Whip Tames Wild Bill Before Mob Of 15,000

Globe & Mail – March 7, 1947
By Allan Nickleson

Whippah Billy Watson retained his newly won world wrestling championship before a jam-packed, roaring multitude of some 15,000 fans at Maple Leaf Gardens last night – and he accomplished the feat fairly easily against the caddish chappie he beat for the bauble. Continue reading

Watson Subdues Rugged O’Donnell In Rough Match

Globe & Mail – February 28, 1947
By Jim Vipond

Whipper Billy Watson, idol of Toronto’s wrestling fandom, took 26 minutes and 21 seconds to successfully defend the initial challenge to his recently won world championship before more than 8,000 rabid supporters at Maple Leaf Gardens last night. Continue reading

Testy Tasker Awards Bout To Sammartino

Globe & Mail – September 27, 1965

Wrestler Johnny Powers caught referee Tiger Tasker in one of his no-trifling moods last night at Maple Leaf Gardens. The result was Powers was disqualified in the main bout with Bruno Sammartino at 16:18. Tasker awarded the one-fall match to Sammartino, a mighty pleasing decision to the crowd of 4,999. Continue reading

Whipper Retains Empire Title As Curfew Ends Kiniski Bout

Globe & Mail – September 24, 1965
By Steve York

They call it all-in wrestling in Britain and a look at the ending of the main bout at Maple Leaf Gardens last night showed why. There was Gene Kiniski…

What? The result? Oh, that was a draw between Whipper Watson and Kiniski. The 11 o’clock curfew halted the one-fall match for the British Empire heavyweight championship at 30:32 and referee Tiger Tasker ruled the outcome a draw. That meant Watson retained the title. Continue reading

Kiniski, Hiro Win Over Johnny, Whip

Globe & Mail – August 27, 1965
By Steve York

Gene Kiniski and Professor Mye Hiro defeated Whipper Watson and Johnny Valentine in the tag-team wrestling feature last night at Maple Leaf Gardens. Kiniski pinned Watson at 15:49 of the one-fall match after he and Hiro had highly agitated the crowd of 2,751.

Given those facts, what kind of snappy opening should you start with?

Should you begin by remarking that the old saying cheaters never prosper was disproved? Because it was.

Watson had his unconscious hold on Hiro near the bad guys’ corner but not close enough for Kiniski to tag the Professor, who appeared to be sinking rapidly.

Since something had to be done in a hurry, the unorthodox Kiniski did it. He climbed to the top rope and jumped on Watson, an illegal move as the partner outside the ring is not supposed to aid the partner inside.

Kiniski’s jump knocked whipper off Hiro and to the mat. Hiro had fallen also and rolled to the ropes, one hand coming up high enough for Kiniski, who had immediately left the ring after his leap, to tag it. Gene fell on top of Watson who was on his back unmoving and referee Tiger Tasker’s victory count was a formality.

Where was Valentine? Held out of the ring by Takser’s officiating associated, Joe Gollub.

Or should you get under way by saying Kiniski obeyed the square-dance injunction to change partners with successful results? Because he did.

Last Thursday, Kiniski was teamed with Johnny Powers and lost to Watson and Valentine.

Both sides in last night’s clash had one member much the worse for wear. Fred Atkins, Hiro’s interpreter and confidant, helped Kiniski to get Hiro to the dressing room. They dumped him over the bottom rope as if he were a side of beef before yanking him to his feet.

Watson lay on the mat motionless after the decision, oblivious to Valentine’s protests to the officials and his attempts to get at Kiniski. He also didn’t notice the fans, including three girls, who entered the ring to gaze at their stricken hero. Finally Andy Robin and Valentine revived the Whip, who spurned a lift to the dressing room on a stretcher. When he got to his feet the lingering customers gave a big cheer and another as he started to the runway supported by Robin and Valentine.

Dick Hutton Captures Lou Thesz’ Mat Crown

Globe & Mail – November 15, 1957
By Steve York

Dick Hutton became a good guy again to 9,099 wrestling fans at Maple Leaf Gardens last night.

All the Oklahoma strong boy did was win over Lou Thesz to become National Wrestling Alliance world’s heavyweight champion.

Hutton forced the veteran to concede when he applied his fearsome abdominal stretch at 35:15 of the one fall, no time limit match. Continue reading

There’s New Mat Champ – Or Did You Know?

The Spokesman-Review – March 23, 1956
By Bill Boni

Somehow I seem to have missed this. But back east in Toronto just a week ago last night, one Whipper Billy Watson won (that’s what it says in three different newspapers) the world heavyweight wrestling championship by beating Lou Thesz. Continue reading

Photographer Flees As Whip Wins

Toronto Star – April 27, 1956
By Jim Proudfoot

Whipper Watson outpointed Hans Schmidt and Hardboiled Haggerty by a matter of two feet in last night’s wrestling headliner at Maple Leaf Gardens.

A cryptic statement, you say? Confusing? Leave us explain. Continue reading

Look Out, Zeb, Whipper’s on the Warpath

Toronto Globe & Mail – November 16, 1951

There’s nothing like the unmasking of a varmint to make the wrestling public perk up like with a shot in the arm and, if you would believe Whipper Watson, who takes care of all kinds of varmints, from English lords to disguised football players, that’s what’s in store next Thursday at the Gardens as wrestling revives itself after a two-week layoff. Continue reading

Circuses And Kings

The Canadian Forum – August, 1950
By D.M. Fisher

Several years ago Time magazine hinted that the large crowds drawn by wrestling in Toronto reflected the gullibility of the citizens. Now, with the surge of television, wrestling has come to the fore in the States; the top men are national figures, and the critics and publicists are debunking or glorifying the show. This is one matter where Canada has kept pace with America. We have the chance, even in the smaller towns, of seeing wrestling, and the attendance has risen until it probably stands behind only hockey and baseball as an athletic draw. No populated area fails to support the grapplers; Toronto, Montreal, and Hamilton turn out supporters enough to gross nearly a million and a half dollars a year. What does wrestling offer for the husky admission it charges? Continue reading