Tag Archives: Joe Stecher

Savoldi Captures Londos Claim To Title

Associated Press –  April 8, 1933

CHICAGO – Jumping Joe Savoldi, who used to shatter football lines for Notre Dame, had one big area of the wrestling world rocking with claims and denials today.

Joe strode into the Chicago Stadium ring last night to tackle Jim Londos, claimant of the championship. To the amazement of 8,000 customers, he walked out with a one-fall victory after 20 minutes and 26 seconds of rough-and-tumble grappling. The match attracted a gate of approximately $12,000. Continue reading

Londos And Stecher Do It All Over Again Tonight

Chicago Tribune – March 3, 1933

Joe Stecher, the Nebraskan who is one of wrestling’s patriarchs by virtue of his years of experience, will seek his fourth lease on the world’s heavyweight championship tonight at the Chicago Stadium. He will engage Jim Londos, who has made the most sustained claim to the crown for the last three years, for the second time in six weeks. Continue reading

Londos-Stecher Mat Drama Goes On Boards Again

Chicago Tribune – March 2, 1933

The second 1933 showing in Chicago of the Jim Londos-Joe Stecher wrestling number, familiar to followers of the grappling pastime at intervals during the last decade, will be presented at the Chicago Stadium tomorrow night before what is expected to be a record crowd at a local match. Continue reading

Jim Londos And Joe Savoldi Meet Tonight

Chicago Tribune – April 7, 1933

Jim Londos and Joe Savoldi will wrestle tonight at the Stadium in the main bout of a five-match program. The encounter is to be decided by one fall, with a time limit of an hour and a half.

In one of the other bouts, Jim McMillen will meet George Zaharias. Matchmaker Coffey has promised McMillen that he will get a chance at the winner of the main bout at a later date if he is victorious tonight. Continue reading

On The Hoof

Saturday Evening Post – December 14, 1935
By Milton MacKaye

The standing of wrestling as a profit-making enterprise has received little attention in the economic journals, and even those publications devoted to the fevers of sport have been niggardly in space and headlines. There has been a general tendency to regard wrestling as a sort of little country cousin of the opulent boxing profession, a rude and primitive trial of strength persisting feebly in the backwoods sections, but destined ultimately to become as extinct as the broadsword. As a public spectacle, it has been rated just ahead of long-distance walking contests and the hop, skip, and jump, and considerably behind the breath-taking thrills and romance of puss-in-the-corner and the potato race. Continue reading

Around Our Town

Humboldt Standard – November 2, 1954
By Scoop Beal

With the announcement that world’s wrestling champion Lou Thesz would come to Eureka next Monday for a match at Municipal Auditorium, there came about much talk of wrestling champions through the ages – there are still a few oldtimers around that remember Frank Gotch as the greatest of them all – and there are the oldtimers who claim that “Strangler” Ed Lewis, champion during the “Golden Age” of sports, was the greatest matman that ever lived – the ruling body of wrestling in the U.S.A. is known as the National Wrestling Alliance – this organization recorded the champions of wrestling from 1905 to the present day, as follows: Continue reading

Mat Outlaws Meet Tonight

International News Service – February 11, 1931

NEW YORK — The so-called “rasslin'” outlaws come to town tonight bent on proving that New York will support two wrestling combines. The new Armory Athletic Club will stage its first show this evening, with Joe Stecher meeting Marin Plestina in the main event.

Pat McGill, the Irish champion, and Al Baffert, the youngster who has made a name for himself in California, will appear in the semifinal.

Wrestling Tourney Scheduled

The New York Times – November 25, 1917

A wrestling tournament at catch-as-catch-can style is to be held at the Lexington Theatre beginning Dec. 3.  Among those who are expected to compete are Earl Caddock, Wladek Zbyszko, Ed Lewis, Joe Stecher, Dr. B. F. Roller, Americus, Jess Westergard, Demetrus Tofalos, Alexander Thomas, Yussif Hussane, Cyclone Burns, Bob Managoff, Henry Ordeman, and John Freyburg.  They comprise the leading wrestlers of the country.

All The Big Ones In Wrestling Were Here

The Spokesman-Review – February 3, 1957

Hat keeps pushing back the glasses that keep sliding down his nose.

“Maybe it isn’t easy to take it easy,” he says.  “You remember so many names – just in wrestling, so many.  They were all here.  Stan Zybyszko, Jimmy Londos, Joe Stecher (he used to split a sack of wheat with his bare hands), Dan Koloff the Hungarian, Joe Savoldi, Dave Burns, who was a middleweight to and now does business in Colfax and Pullman. Continue reading

The Sports Spy Glass By Hutch

Arizona Republic – March 3, 1931

Seems like I can’t get Pete Sauer out of my mind and with the mail carrying reams of copy about the great wrestlers of the day, I have the impression that Pete is being the run-around by most of the front-rank matmen. Continue reading