Tag Archives: Gene Kiniski

Testy Tasker Awards Bout To Sammartino

Globe & Mail – September 27, 1965

Wrestler Johnny Powers caught referee Tiger Tasker in one of his no-trifling moods last night at Maple Leaf Gardens. The result was Powers was disqualified in the main bout with Bruno Sammartino at 16:18. Tasker awarded the one-fall match to Sammartino, a mighty pleasing decision to the crowd of 4,999. Continue reading

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Whipper Retains Empire Title As Curfew Ends Kiniski Bout

Globe & Mail – September 24, 1965
By Steve York

They call it all-in wrestling in Britain and a look at the ending of the main bout at Maple Leaf Gardens last night showed why. There was Gene Kiniski…

What? The result? Oh, that was a draw between Whipper Watson and Kiniski. The 11 o’clock curfew halted the one-fall match for the British Empire heavyweight championship at 30:32 and referee Tiger Tasker ruled the outcome a draw. That meant Watson retained the title. Continue reading

Kiniski, Hiro Win Over Johnny, Whip

Globe & Mail – August 27, 1965
By Steve York

Gene Kiniski and Professor Mye Hiro defeated Whipper Watson and Johnny Valentine in the tag-team wrestling feature last night at Maple Leaf Gardens. Kiniski pinned Watson at 15:49 of the one-fall match after he and Hiro had highly agitated the crowd of 2,751.

Given those facts, what kind of snappy opening should you start with?

Should you begin by remarking that the old saying cheaters never prosper was disproved? Because it was.

Watson had his unconscious hold on Hiro near the bad guys’ corner but not close enough for Kiniski to tag the Professor, who appeared to be sinking rapidly.

Since something had to be done in a hurry, the unorthodox Kiniski did it. He climbed to the top rope and jumped on Watson, an illegal move as the partner outside the ring is not supposed to aid the partner inside.

Kiniski’s jump knocked whipper off Hiro and to the mat. Hiro had fallen also and rolled to the ropes, one hand coming up high enough for Kiniski, who had immediately left the ring after his leap, to tag it. Gene fell on top of Watson who was on his back unmoving and referee Tiger Tasker’s victory count was a formality.

Where was Valentine? Held out of the ring by Takser’s officiating associated, Joe Gollub.

Or should you get under way by saying Kiniski obeyed the square-dance injunction to change partners with successful results? Because he did.

Last Thursday, Kiniski was teamed with Johnny Powers and lost to Watson and Valentine.

Both sides in last night’s clash had one member much the worse for wear. Fred Atkins, Hiro’s interpreter and confidant, helped Kiniski to get Hiro to the dressing room. They dumped him over the bottom rope as if he were a side of beef before yanking him to his feet.

Watson lay on the mat motionless after the decision, oblivious to Valentine’s protests to the officials and his attempts to get at Kiniski. He also didn’t notice the fans, including three girls, who entered the ring to gaze at their stricken hero. Finally Andy Robin and Valentine revived the Whip, who spurned a lift to the dressing room on a stretcher. When he got to his feet the lingering customers gave a big cheer and another as he started to the runway supported by Robin and Valentine.

Dick Hutton Captures Lou Thesz’ Mat Crown

Globe & Mail – November 15, 1957
By Steve York

Dick Hutton became a good guy again to 9,099 wrestling fans at Maple Leaf Gardens last night.

All the Oklahoma strong boy did was win over Lou Thesz to become National Wrestling Alliance world’s heavyweight champion.

Hutton forced the veteran to concede when he applied his fearsome abdominal stretch at 35:15 of the one fall, no time limit match. Continue reading

Still Fighting Proud

Toronto Sun – March 3, 2001

Back when men were men and women were used to it, one man stood out as the brute we all loved to hate.

Gene Kiniski was a professional wrestler for more than 40 years, tossing opponents around the ring from 1952 until he finally hung up his battered tunic in 1994 at the grandfatherly age of 64. Continue reading

Texan Funk Defeats Kiniski In Feature

St. Petersburg Times – February 12, 1969

TAMPA – Dory Funk Jr., former West Texas State tackle from Amarillo, Tex., defeated Gene Kiniski in the feature match of last night’s wrestling show at Fort Homer Hesterly Armory. Continue reading

Sports Around The Area

Milwaukee Sentinel – December 9, 1985

Jerry Blackwell defeated Michael Hayes in the strap match main event on Saturday night’s pro wrestling card at the Auditorium.  Blackwell won the match when Hayes fled from the ring and was counted out. Continue reading

Blackwell Wins Feature

The Milwaukee Journal – December 8, 1985

Jerry Blackwell beat Michael Hayes in the main event on the professional wrestling card at the Auditorium Saturday night before a crowd of 2,648.

Continue reading

Hutton Retains Laurels, Holding Thesz To Draw

Globe & Mail – August 22, 1958
By Ken McKee

Dick Hutton is still champion of Oklahoma and the National Wrestling Alliance’s world – and nothing Lou Thesz can say or do is going to change it.

Lou, who somehow manages to be the people’s cherce hereabouts as long as he isn’t facing Whipper Watson, did his best to talk Hutton into an extra five minutes of grappling last night after the main event – a one-fall affair – had been tolled to a halt by the curfew after 36 minutes of skill, science and Hutton’s canny rewrites of the NWA rule book, if there is one.

Special referee Wilbur Snyder checked with Hutton. Oklahoma’s Dick would have none of it. Snyder’s decision hadn’t been announced, and the champ was “quite sure” he had won anyhow, and couldn’t see any reason for wasting five more minutes of his valuable time.

Since the commissioner wasn’t in the house of 5,555, ring officials couldn’t waive the 11:15 p.m. curfew, so the result stood.

While the main go produced plenty of the more scientific aspects of the game, it remained for a lowly preliminary bout to bring the fans in droves to ringside, mayhem in their eyes, rotten eggs in their hands.

The cause of their ire? Ah, yes, mother, you guessed it. Gentle Gene Kiniski, as gracious and kind a character as ever graced a Charles Addams cartoon, was in against Tarzan Tourville. And in spite of the fact that Tarzan is a Montrealer, he was popular.

Kiniski spent about 10 minutes and some seconds tearing him up, and after the bout, Gentle Gene engaged in some crowd baiting, interspersed with frequent trips back to the ring where a slightly foggy Tarzan was looking for daylight.

Finally, after he had seen enough from his seat in the stands, one Whipper Billy Watson – there is only one! – came upon the scene, and without so much as mussing his hair, sent the Gentle One upon his way.

In fact, Kiniski’s braggadoccio changed to cringing fear as soon as Whipper hove into view.

The Whip, along with the Miller clan, Ed, Big Mill and their iddy, biddy brother, Dan, were on hand later to hurl challenges. It ended up this way: The Millers, any or all, will face any tag team which promoter Frank Tunney can sign for the task, and will beat them – they say.

And Watson, rarin’ to go after a hospital and recovery period of idleness, will team with Bo-Bo Brazil in a bid to lift the tag team crown off the blond heads of the Lisowski brothers in next week’s main event.

Watson also challenged the winner of the title match – but he’ll have to wait for that one, since there wasn’t a winner, and Hutton reportedly headed back to Oklahoma.

Other prelims: Guy Brunetti, 236, and Joe Brunetti, 233, defeated Lee Henning, 250, and Fred Atkins, 248. Joe Brunetti pinned Lee Henning with drop kick and top spread at 12:46 of scheduled 30-minute bout; Frenchy Vignal, 240, defeated Abe Zvonkin, 250, with airplane spin and top spread at 10:45 of scheduled 20-minute bout; Maurice Lapointe, 232, and Carl Kulaski, 238, wrestled 20 minutes to a draw.