Tag Archives: Ed Don George

Santa Claus Arrives Here Little Early For George

New York Post – December 16, 1935
By Eddie Wade

Poppa Curley Plays Santa Claus... by Uhlmann

Poppa Curley Plays Santa Claus… by Uhlmann

Grappler Don Hangs Xmas Sock in Bid to Regain Mat Crown

 Third Time Danno, Challenger Meet

Santa Claus comes early this year.  At least he does to Ed Don George, the former heavyweight wrestling champion of the world, who gets a chance to even matters tonight with the current title-holder, Danno O’Mahoney, at Madison Square Garden. Continue reading

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On the Mat

Time – February 2, 1931

In Madison Square Garden, Jim Londos humped an enormous torso shaped like a single pile of white dough and topped with a tiny spike of head, wrapped his arms around Jim McMillen, U. S. wrestler who once played with Red Grange on Illinois’ football team. For 56 minutes, 54 seconds they grunted, sweated, flopped with terrific thuds on the canvas. Once Londos threw McMillen out of the ring. Then McMillen slipped Londos through the ropes. Then both fell down into the press bench, were helped in again, resumed grappling. At last Londos picked up McMillen, slapped him down, rolled him over with a quick half Nelson that won the match and kept one of the world’s heavyweight wrestling championships safe for Greece. Two nights before the bout, at a dinner in the Madison Square Garden Club, lion-headed, box-chested Londos had been presented with a jeweled gold belt supposed to symbolize the wrestling championship of the world. However, it is not the only belt with this significance. Don George, Michigan graduate, also claims the world’s championship because he beat Gus Sonnenberg two months ago. Not since herculean Frank Gotch retired in 1913, after a career in which he won 154 matches out of 160, has there been an undisputed heavyweight wrestling champion. In the last seven years two main groups of wrestlers have emerged to do business separately, each with its own champion: a group controlled by Promoter Jack Curley in the East, the other by old-time Billy Sandoz in the Midwest and on the Pacific Coast. Curley’s champion is recognized by the National Boxing Association, whose authority over wrestling is vague. Sandoz’ champion is supported mainly in Massachusetts, Michigan and California. To Curley goes credit for having revived wrestling, long discredited by its reputation as an incurably crooked sport, as a big money-maker in eastern cities.* It is still maintained by experts, and borne out in college wrestling, that when wrestlers are sincere they immediately fall to the mat and lie prone, grunting, until one succumbs from fatigue. No matter what can be said for its spirit, such sincerity is exceedingly weak as entertainment.

*Rev. Charley Urban, onetime University of Pennsylvania footballer and 220lb. wrestler, signed a professional wrestling contract with a Philadelphia promoter. “A preacher doesn’t get much money and the little I can make on the side will keep me in a cheerful frame of mind which . . . will be reflected in my sermons,” said he.

Lewis Regains Mat Title, Challenges Londos

New York World-Telegram – April 14, 1931

LOS ANGELES — (Special) — Those two college boys, Gus Sonnenberg and Ed Don George, have played around with it long enough. The veteran Ed (Strangler) Lewis last night beat the latter to win claim to the world heavyweight wrestling title for the third time, and today challenged Jim Londos to a match that would clear up the controversy over the crown. Continue reading

George To Seek Best Mat Stars

Los Angeles Times – October 5, 1930

Don George, former national amateur champion and only undefeated top-notch heavyweight grappler in the game, yesterday asked Promoter Lou Daro for a chance to meet some of the nationally known first-raters here. Continue reading

On The Hoof

Saturday Evening Post – December 14, 1935
By Milton MacKaye

The standing of wrestling as a profit-making enterprise has received little attention in the economic journals, and even those publications devoted to the fevers of sport have been niggardly in space and headlines. There has been a general tendency to regard wrestling as a sort of little country cousin of the opulent boxing profession, a rude and primitive trial of strength persisting feebly in the backwoods sections, but destined ultimately to become as extinct as the broadsword. As a public spectacle, it has been rated just ahead of long-distance walking contests and the hop, skip, and jump, and considerably behind the breath-taking thrills and romance of puss-in-the-corner and the potato race. Continue reading

Around Our Town

Humboldt Standard – November 2, 1954
By Scoop Beal

With the announcement that world’s wrestling champion Lou Thesz would come to Eureka next Monday for a match at Municipal Auditorium, there came about much talk of wrestling champions through the ages – there are still a few oldtimers around that remember Frank Gotch as the greatest of them all – and there are the oldtimers who claim that “Strangler” Ed Lewis, champion during the “Golden Age” of sports, was the greatest matman that ever lived – the ruling body of wrestling in the U.S.A. is known as the National Wrestling Alliance – this organization recorded the champions of wrestling from 1905 to the present day, as follows: Continue reading

Hardboiled Haggerty Stops El Pulpo In Mat Massacre

Los Angeles Times – October 27, 1938
By Jack Singer

W.P.A. crews, working in shifts, last night were removing the broken body of El Pulpo, the Mexican Octopus Man, in sections and transporting said torso the glue factory where, attendants report, there is a 50-50 chance that it will be patched up again as good as new, give or take an arm. Continue reading

The M. Londes Names Stars Of The Mat

Detroit Free Press – January 1, 1934
By Charles B. Ward

When Monsieur Jacques Curley, New York wrestling promoter, announced his ratings of the heavyweight wrestlers of the world Saturday night he just about ruined the New Year for Monsieur Nick Londes, Detroit wrestling promoter. Continue reading

Al Mercier To Oppose World’s Champion Don George Here Next Week

The Lewiston Daily Sun – March 10, 1933

Ed Don George 3-10-33

Ed Don George, heavyweight wrestling champion of the world, will defend his title against Al Mercier of Montreal in the feature event of an all-star wrestling program which Promoter John McGee has lined up for City hall a week from tonight.  It will mark the second appearance of George in this city but his first visit here as a champion.  Indications point to a record crowd at City hall as Mercier has shown in his recent performances here that he is capable of giving the champion a good run and extend the title-holder to the limit for the benefit of local fans. Continue reading

Lewis Seeks Fourth Title

Los Angeles Times – April 12, 1931

Will Ed (Strangler) Lewis become the first heavyweight wrestler to be world’s mat king four times?

That is one of the interesting questions being asked by those who follow wrestling closely in connection with Lewis’ scheduled finish title mat battle with champion Ed “Don” George at Wrigley Field the 13th inst.

Lewis and Joe Stecher are the only wrestlers in the heavyweight division who have won the title three times. Lewis’ chances of being the first to win it a fourth time are rated higher than the body-scissor exponent’s from Nebraska.

The title has changed hands twenty-four times since the first mat tournament in this country, which was held March 10, 1870, in Detroit, Mich., and won by James H. McLaughlin.

Because of the interest in the title battle at Wrigley Field a review of past titleholders and title-changing matches is in order.