Tag Archives: Floyd Marshall

Phelan Orders Wrestling Cleanup

Syracuse Herald – September 27, 1934

A demoralized group of Syracuse wrestling and boxing officials were awaiting further word from the offices of the New York State Athletic Commission today, following an unexpected investigation on the part of Gen. John J. Phelan, chairman of the sports board, here last night. Continue reading

Sandor Vary In Mat Test

New York Post – December 20, 1935

Savoldi and Barber Top Wrestling Card at Armory

Sandor Vary, Hungarian heavyweight, is an added attraction on the heavyweight wrestling card topped by Joe Savoldi and Hank Barber, former collegians. Continue reading

Santa Claus Arrives Here Little Early For George

New York Post – December 16, 1935
By Eddie Wade

Poppa Curley Plays Santa Claus... by Uhlmann

Poppa Curley Plays Santa Claus… by Uhlmann

Grappler Don Hangs Xmas Sock in Bid to Regain Mat Crown

 Third Time Danno, Challenger Meet

Santa Claus comes early this year.  At least he does to Ed Don George, the former heavyweight wrestling champion of the world, who gets a chance to even matters tonight with the current title-holder, Danno O’Mahoney, at Madison Square Garden. Continue reading

Szabo Pins Marshall In Feature At Yonkers

New York World Telegram – December 4, 1931

Sandor Szabo of Hungary, 203, threw Floyd Marshall of California, 212, after 16:15 of the feature finish match at the Columbus Sporting Club in Yonkers last night before a crowd of 1,500 spectators. The winner used a suplex hold to down his opponent. Other results: Continue reading

Szabo, Dr. Wilson Battle To Yonkers Draw

New York World Telegram – November 20, 1931

Sandor Szabo, 203 pounds, of Hungary, and Dr. Ralph Wilson, 206, of Philadelphia, wrestled to a draw in the feature finish match at the Columbus Sports Club, Yonkers, before a crowd of 2,000 last night. The match was halted at the end of an hour of grappling by the New York State Athletic Commission’s 11 o’clock rule. Continue reading

Stepping Stones: Clark, Marshall Assist Thesz Toward The Crowded Throne

Hartford Times – January 19, 1938
By Stuart Henderson

Suspicion that husky George Clark, the Loch Lomond Monster, had been offered sacrificially on the altar of buildup for yet another wrestling champion lurked in the minds of Hartford’s grappling fans today.

Louis (Don) Thesz, billed as champion of the world (in Missouri), tossed the 226-pound Scot twice in succession at Foot Guard Armory last night. Mr. Thesz accomplished his end efficiently and easily.

Using the identical airplane spin with which he dumped Floyd Marshall into the resin at Worcester the other night, Louis — or Don — flipped Clark for the first fall in 17 minutes.

Thesz employed an old Missouri gag to gain the second, and deciding, tumble. He stood in back of Clark with an arm hold clasped on the Scot. George essayed a back-drop, a maneuver he completed successfully shortly before. Thesz stepped to one side and literally let Clark throw himself. The second installment of the thing lasted 40 minutes and 30 seconds.

If Thesz is to be generally recognized as a champion in the select company of Bronko Nagurski & Company, his advancement will not be totally undeserved. The Missourian is constructed along the general lines of a Percheron draft horse and, in spite of his 221 pounds, flits about like a scared shadow. Even with the party of the second part in complete accord, the task of lifting and spinning an adversary of better than 225 pounds is no child’s play.

Sharing interest with the night’s feature bout was the sad case of Al Getz, the Manchester groaner who never lost a bout in Hartford until last night.

During the main go, Thesz made effective use of a flying scissors. A gander at the agile youngster cavorting like a flyweight was worth a trip to the hall. Although most of the tumbling was all in fun, the boys underwent a rather thorough going over in the course of the evening. Both were slammed hard to set the lights dancing. Clark admitted defeat — but wait until he meets this guy in Fall River.

Charlie Strack of Oklahoma and Frank Judson, former mat coach at Harvard, staged a rough-tough match which ended in a draw. Many an elbow was floated during the bout and if any wrestling regulations were not violated, it was not brought to this writer’s attention.

Roy Dunn of Amarillo, Texas, easily pinned Heimie Olson, a Minnesota product, with a flying scissors and lock in 10 minutes and 30 seconds in the opener. Dunn will meet George (K.O.) Koverly in the star bout next week.

More than $56 was contributed by the fans to President Roosevelt’s infantile paralysis fund, after an appeal by Dr. Herbert Bailey.

O’Mahoney Tosses Chief Little Wolf

The New York Times – July 9, 1935
By Joseph C. Nichols

Dan O’Mahoney was successful in his first defense of the world’s heavyweight wrestling championship. The 22-year-old Irishman defeated Little Wolf of Trinidad, Col., in 28 minutes, 23 seconds at the Yankee Stadium last night while a crowd of 12,000 persons looked on.

The bout was promoted by Jack Curley and a percentage of the receipts will be turned over to the Free Milk Fund for Babies, Inc., of which Mrs. William Randolph Hearst is chairman.

While O’Mahoney’s victory was not a surprise, generally, the manner in which he disposed of his first challenger was. Instead of effecting the triumph with the Irish whip, the grip with which he has won most of his bouts, O’Mahoney pressed Little Wolf’s shoulders to the mat with a body hold after getting him into position with a flying scissors.

Until a few minutes before he was tossed, Little Wolf had a decided advantage over the young Irishman. He punished O’Mahoney several times with crushing head locks and gave the impression that he had little to fear from the invader.

Once O’Mahoney did apply the Irish whip, but it had so little effect on the challenger that he walked into the Irishman disdainfully. He became rough and tossed the titleholder about easily.

This treatment incensed O’Mahoney, who had been quite calm since the bout started. He suddenly sprang at the Coloradoan and smashed him to the floor three times with his right forearm.

Little Wolf was weakened and rendered dizzy by this quick turn, and it was nothing for O’Mahoney to whirl him to the floor. There the champion clamped a body hold on his foe, and forced the chief’s shoulders to the mat.

The champion scaled 224 pounds and Little Wolf 210.

Jim Browning, former heavyweight champion, pinned Mike Mazurki of Troy in 13 minutes 54 seconds with a turn-over reverse body scissors in the semi-final.

Mazurki carried the action to Browning at the start and had a slight edge over the ex-ruler until he allowed himself to fall into an airplane scissors. The hold weakened the up-Stater, who gradually was beaten to the mat by the steady Browning. The weights were 231 for the winner as against 228 for Mazurki.

Rube Wright of Texas scored a surprise triumph over Joe Savoldi, former Notre Dame football ace, in a bout listed for thirty minutes. Savoldi, trying to down Wright with a flying tackle, hurled himself through the ropes and landed on the ground. While he was out of the ring Referee Joe Boyle counted ten.

Savoldi did get back after the count was finished and was in shape to continue, but the referee’s count precluded any further action. Wright was 29 pounds heavier than Savoldi, who scaled 201. The bout lasted 6 minutes 9 seconds.

Abe Coleman of Los Angeles wrestled to a draw with Gino Garibaldi, Italian giant, in a thirty-minute encounter. Coleman had his foe in danger several times with crushing body holds, but Garibaldi wriggled free and punished the Californian with flying tackles. Coleman scaled 205 and Garibaldi 214.

Al Bisignano, 212, of Des Moines, Iowa, defeated Floyd Marshall, 225, of Phoenix, Ariz., in a scheduled thirty-minute encounter. Bisignano pinned his rival in 10:26 with a body slam.

Hank Barber, erstwhile Dartmouth athlete, won the opening bout on the card. He threw Pat McKay of Memphis in 13:49 with a flying tackle and body press. Barber, at 228, was 8 pounds heavier than McKay.