Tag Archives: Tom Jenkins

De Rouen Versus The Turk

La Patrie – November 27, 1908

These Two Colossi Will Come To Grips Tonight, At Sohmer Park

Jenkins Was Defeated Last Night

OUR MODERN BEHEMOTHS

A Bulletin from New York tells us that Yussif Mahmout, known as the Terrible Turk, has defeated Tom Jenkins, ex-champion wrestler of America, winning the first two falls of his “match” with him, at Madison Square Garden, last night. Continue reading

Science Of Wrestling

Physical Culture – March 1903
By Bernarr Macfadden

Illustrated by Photographs Specially Posed by Tom Jenkins and Clarence Boudin

Tom Jenkins  World's Champion Catch-as-Catch-Can Wrestler

Tom Jenkins
World’s Champion Catch-as-Catch-Can Wrestler

Tom Jenkins, until recently the world’s champion catch-as-catch-can wrestler, whose photographs illustrate the wrestling tricks shown in this article, is a remarkable specimen of physical manhood.  Every line of his body indicates the rugged vigor which has enabled him to win so many hard fought contests.  Recently he was beaten by Dan McLeod, though he claims that his defeat was due to a bad leg, and he expects to wrestle his conquerer again in the near future. Continue reading

Jenkins To Wrestle Cazeaux

Associated Press – May 11, 1908

NEW YORK – Tom Jenkins and Cazeaux, the French wrestler, will meet in a mixed match at Madison Square Garden Monday night. The men will wrestle Graeco-Roman and catch-as-catch-can in the first two bouts and the one winning the fall in the fastest time will have the choice of naming the style for the third.

Jenkins Challenges Gotch

Associated Press – April 22, 1908

NEW YORK – Tom Jenkins, at one time wrestling champion of America, has issued a challenge to wrestle Frank Gotch again for the title. Jenkins was at one time wrestling instructor at the military academy at West Point.

Tom Jenkins Sails For European Mats

The Washington Times – August 14, 1905

CLEVELAND, Ohio. Aug. 14–Tom Jenkins, of this city, the champion wrestler of the United States has sailed for England on the steamship New York. Continue reading

Wrestling Championship

The New York Times – March 12, 1905

The Gotch-Jenkins Match Will Take Place in the Garden.

Frank Gotch, America’s champion catch-as-catch-can, will be here to-morrow morning to complete arrangements for his match with Tom Jenkins, the ex-champion, at Madison Square Garden on Wednesday night. Continue reading

Wrestling Match

The Evening News – January 10, 1905

San Francisco, Cal., Jan. 10. – The most important wrestling match to be seen hereabouts in a long time is scheduled for Woodward’s pavilion tonight when Tom Jenkins and Jack Carkeek are to engage in a bout to settle the question of relative supremacy.  The men have been training faithfully since the match was made and a lively contest is expected to be the outcome.  The articles of agreement call for the best two out of three falls, catch-as-catch-can rules to govern.

Rouen Throws Tom Jenkins

The New York Times – March 28, 1914

OTTAWA, Ontario, March 27. – Raoul De Rouen, heavyweight champion wrestler of France, again defeated Tom Jenkins here to-night, De Rouen took the first fall in 31 minutes with a body hold in chancery, and the second in 10 minutes with a toe hold.

Champion Got Start Via Defeat By Ringer

Chicago Tribune – March 30, 1913
By Harvey T. Woodruff

Frank A. Gotch, world’s champion wrestler, met a “ringer” in his first serious engagement on the mat. Gotch proved inferior to the scientific tricks of his opponent and was thrown, but the realization that it took Dan McLeod, then in his prime, one hour and forty-one minutes and forty-six minutes, respectively, to tumble him fully decided Gotch in his budding determination to become a champion grappler. Continue reading

Many Extremes in Wrestling

Syracuse Journal – March 14, 1907

In the wrestling game there are more extremes than there are in any other form of sport.  Hackenschmidt, for instance, is the strongest and the youngest in the point of years; Dan McLeod is without any shadow of doubt the most graceful of all grapplers; Hjalmar Lundin is regarded as the speediest; Frank Gotch, as the most vicious; Farmer Burns, as the oldest; Tom Jenkins, as the hardiest; Jim Parr, the English champion, as the most original and sensational; Ed Atherton, as the originator and creator of new moves; Harvey Parker, as the toughest of the welters to handle in any manner; Jack Carkeek, the “resurrected,” because he came back after an absence of ten years and is to-day regarded as fast enough for the best of the 175-pound men of the country; Fred Beell, as the world’s wonder for his size and weight; Steurs, the Belgian, as the roughest.  The list might be lengthened indefinitely.

Lundin, the giant Swede, is looked upon as the cleanest of the big fellows.