Tag Archives: Tarzan Tourville

Hutton Retains Laurels, Holding Thesz To Draw

Globe & Mail – August 22, 1958
By Ken McKee

Dick Hutton is still champion of Oklahoma and the National Wrestling Alliance’s world – and nothing Lou Thesz can say or do is going to change it.

Lou, who somehow manages to be the people’s cherce hereabouts as long as he isn’t facing Whipper Watson, did his best to talk Hutton into an extra five minutes of grappling last night after the main event – a one-fall affair – had been tolled to a halt by the curfew after 36 minutes of skill, science and Hutton’s canny rewrites of the NWA rule book, if there is one.

Special referee Wilbur Snyder checked with Hutton. Oklahoma’s Dick would have none of it. Snyder’s decision hadn’t been announced, and the champ was “quite sure” he had won anyhow, and couldn’t see any reason for wasting five more minutes of his valuable time.

Since the commissioner wasn’t in the house of 5,555, ring officials couldn’t waive the 11:15 p.m. curfew, so the result stood.

While the main go produced plenty of the more scientific aspects of the game, it remained for a lowly preliminary bout to bring the fans in droves to ringside, mayhem in their eyes, rotten eggs in their hands.

The cause of their ire? Ah, yes, mother, you guessed it. Gentle Gene Kiniski, as gracious and kind a character as ever graced a Charles Addams cartoon, was in against Tarzan Tourville. And in spite of the fact that Tarzan is a Montrealer, he was popular.

Kiniski spent about 10 minutes and some seconds tearing him up, and after the bout, Gentle Gene engaged in some crowd baiting, interspersed with frequent trips back to the ring where a slightly foggy Tarzan was looking for daylight.

Finally, after he had seen enough from his seat in the stands, one Whipper Billy Watson – there is only one! – came upon the scene, and without so much as mussing his hair, sent the Gentle One upon his way.

In fact, Kiniski’s braggadoccio changed to cringing fear as soon as Whipper hove into view.

The Whip, along with the Miller clan, Ed, Big Mill and their iddy, biddy brother, Dan, were on hand later to hurl challenges. It ended up this way: The Millers, any or all, will face any tag team which promoter Frank Tunney can sign for the task, and will beat them – they say.

And Watson, rarin’ to go after a hospital and recovery period of idleness, will team with Bo-Bo Brazil in a bid to lift the tag team crown off the blond heads of the Lisowski brothers in next week’s main event.

Watson also challenged the winner of the title match – but he’ll have to wait for that one, since there wasn’t a winner, and Hutton reportedly headed back to Oklahoma.

Other prelims: Guy Brunetti, 236, and Joe Brunetti, 233, defeated Lee Henning, 250, and Fred Atkins, 248. Joe Brunetti pinned Lee Henning with drop kick and top spread at 12:46 of scheduled 30-minute bout; Frenchy Vignal, 240, defeated Abe Zvonkin, 250, with airplane spin and top spread at 10:45 of scheduled 20-minute bout; Maurice Lapointe, 232, and Carl Kulaski, 238, wrestled 20 minutes to a draw.

Hutton Is Carried Out But Retains His Title

Globe & Mail – August 15, 1958
By Rex MacLeod

Dick Hutton was freighted out of Maple Leaf Gardens ring on a stretcher last night – still the recumbent champeen of the National Wrestling Alliance and a few allied outposts.

Champeens, as a rule, don’t leave the ring in this manner, a point which was argued forcibly by challenger Lou Thesz, who had hopes of regaining the title he had held for many years.

But referee Bert Maxwell, a portly chappie who is devoid of sentiment, declined to indulge in any bandinage. He disqualified Thesz after 24 minutes and two seconds of highly skillful grappling.

Naturally there was an uproar among the crowd of 6,002. Many thought that Thesz had won legitimately. A few expressed concern about the motionless Hutton and a few others thought that Maxwell had lost a few more marbles.

The end, to coin a phrase, came unexpectedly although Thesz, seemingly enraged by Maxwell’s peculiar concept of justice, had been growing more angry by the second. And when Thesz gets angry he grows muscles on his muscles.

In one moment of fury he hurled Hutton, a mere 250 pounds, out of the ring to the cement floor. Hutton, the fool, tried to climb back into the ring but Thesz drop-kicked him back to the cement.

Hutton arose groggily and once more tried to get back. Again Thesz went airborne to launch a drop kick but this time Maxwell somehow got in the prohibited area. He took the full impact of Thesz’ drop kick on one of his chins and fell flopping like a beached porpoise on the ring apron.

Hutton, meanwhile, had climbed wearily through the ropes, a reckless manoeuver. Thesz hoisted him aloft, aimed carefully and slammed him all over the canvas.

Thesz was perched on the comatose Hutton when Maxwell reeled back into the ring and clapped Thesz on the back. Numerous fans thought that Maxwell was proclaiming Thesz the winner. There was some jubilation but it was short-lived. Maxwell was merely informing everyone that Thesz had been disqualified.

Naturally Thesz protested. He gesticulated wildly, even threatened to punch Maxwell. He pleaded that he had not kicked Maxwell intentionally but the referee ignored him.

Hutton was examined briefly in the ring by a doctor before he was borne away to the dressing room. It was announced later that he did not suffer any ill effects.

The gigantic Miller brothers, Ed and Bill, won their tag team match in the semi-final by defeating Athol Layton and George Pencheff. Ed Miller subdued Pencheff with an expanding back-breaker at 23:42. Seconds before the playful Millers had played wishbone with the exhausted Pencheff.

In other exhibitions of skill and science Tarzan Tourville dispatched Tiger Tasker with a series of drop kicks, fancy Frenchy Vignal stopped Al Korman with an airplane spin and spread, and Wilbur Snyder won by disqualification over Dan Miller, younger member of the rowdy clan.