Tag Archives: Kevin Von Erich

Born-Again Bashing

Penthouse – October, 1988
By Irving Muchnick

MAY 11, 1987. Less than a month after his brother Mike killed himself because he felt he couldn’t live up to the family name, Kevin Von Erich was working the main event in Fort Worth when something rare happened: a moment of spontaneous, unmediated terror. As the television cameras rolled, teenage girls squealed, and spectators shouted for blood, Kevin and his opponent crisscrossed off the ropes. No doubt they were setting up the usual wild finish – perhaps a variation on the patented Von Erich Iron Claw, or a violent collision followed by an out-of-control brawl outside the ring, or maybe a miscarriage of justice with the ref taking an accidental bump and failing to see the heel clobber the baby face with a foreign object. Continue reading

The Squared Circle

Beaver County Times – July 25, 2002

TOP 10

KURT ANGLE

KURT ANGLE

1. The Undertaker
2. Rob Van Dam
3. Brock Lesnar
4. Kurt Angle
5. Jamie Noble
6. Eddie Guerrero
7. Test
8. Booker T
9. Ken Shamrock, NWA-TNA
10. Jeff Hardy

ERIC BISCHOFF

ERIC BISCHOFF

Look for: Eric Bischoff to recruit many “Smackdown!” superstars and feud with some of his old WCW wrestlers. Continue reading

‘Faded Glory: The Von Erich Story’

Dallas Observer – March 16, 2000
By Robert Wilonsky

“It’s astonishing no one has yet turned the Von Erichs’ tragic tale into a big-screen biopic; after all, theirs is a story shot through with enough drama and trauma to level any audience. Or maybe it’s possible that no one will believe their tale, as fact or fiction. For a brief, shining moment, Fritz Von Erich and his boys (Kevin, Kerry, Michael, and David) ruled the wrestling world with an Iron Claw, only to succumb to drug abuse, suicide, and a thousand pounds of pain. Rusty Baker’s documentary does an admirable job of presenting the short-hand tale of the Von Erichs, using home movies and footage from matches (even Kevin’s very first in 1976); and it’s gripping to hear Fritz, now dead, speak from beyond the grave about the two things he loved most in this world — his sons, and beating the hell out of anyone who dared step into the squared circle with the meanest wrestler in Texas . . . Kevin is the last of Fritz’s four sons (Jackie died when he was a child, electrocuted in a trailer park) — the sole survivor of an ill-fated clan. Sometimes, this family’s story is too sad even to contemplate.”