Tag Archives: Joe Savoldi

Lewis Regains Mat Title, Challenges Londos

New York World-Telegram – April 14, 1931

LOS ANGELES — (Special) — Those two college boys, Gus Sonnenberg and Ed Don George, have played around with it long enough. The veteran Ed (Strangler) Lewis last night beat the latter to win claim to the world heavyweight wrestling title for the third time, and today challenged Jim Londos to a match that would clear up the controversy over the crown. Continue reading

Londos To Meet Savoldi Tonight

Associated Press –  April 7, 1933

CHICAGO – Jim Londos of Greece risks his claim to the world’s heavyweight wrestling championship against the rushes of Jumping Joe Savoldi of Notre Dame football fame tonight. A crowd of 20,000 was expected to jam the Chicago Stadium to watch the match.

Some of the so-called “wise ones” of the wrestling game predicted that Savoldi would win or hold the Grecian Adonis to a draw.

George-Savoldi Mat Bout Looms

Associated Press – April 11, 1933

BOSTON – After endorsing the Illinois Athletic Association’s moratorium on wrestling, president Thomas Reardon of the American Wrestling Association tonight said his organization would recognize the winner of an Ed George-Joe Savoldi match as the world champion. Continue reading

Savoldi Captures Londos Claim To Title

Associated Press –  April 8, 1933

CHICAGO – Jumping Joe Savoldi, who used to shatter football lines for Notre Dame, had one big area of the wrestling world rocking with claims and denials today.

Joe strode into the Chicago Stadium ring last night to tackle Jim Londos, claimant of the championship. To the amazement of 8,000 customers, he walked out with a one-fall victory after 20 minutes and 26 seconds of rough-and-tumble grappling. The match attracted a gate of approximately $12,000. Continue reading

Londos And Stecher Do It All Over Again Tonight

Chicago Tribune – March 3, 1933

Joe Stecher, the Nebraskan who is one of wrestling’s patriarchs by virtue of his years of experience, will seek his fourth lease on the world’s heavyweight championship tonight at the Chicago Stadium. He will engage Jim Londos, who has made the most sustained claim to the crown for the last three years, for the second time in six weeks. Continue reading

Londos-Stecher Mat Drama Goes On Boards Again

Chicago Tribune – March 2, 1933

The second 1933 showing in Chicago of the Jim Londos-Joe Stecher wrestling number, familiar to followers of the grappling pastime at intervals during the last decade, will be presented at the Chicago Stadium tomorrow night before what is expected to be a record crowd at a local match. Continue reading

Jim Londos And Joe Savoldi Meet Tonight

Chicago Tribune – April 7, 1933

Jim Londos and Joe Savoldi will wrestle tonight at the Stadium in the main bout of a five-match program. The encounter is to be decided by one fall, with a time limit of an hour and a half.

In one of the other bouts, Jim McMillen will meet George Zaharias. Matchmaker Coffey has promised McMillen that he will get a chance at the winner of the main bout at a later date if he is victorious tonight. Continue reading

Deny Savoldi Claim Of Title

Associated Press – April 26, 1933

PHILADELPHIA – The claim of “Jumping Joe” Savoldi to the world’s heavyweight wrestling championship was denied today by the Pennsylvania State Athletic Commission which ruled that Jim Londos retains his title ranking in the Keystone State.

Browning Wins Nod From Savoldi At Stadium

Associated Press – June 12, 1933

Yankee Stadium, NEW YORK – It took Jim Browning, champion of one wing of the wrestling party, almost two full hours tonight to gain a decision over Joe Savoldi, title pretender from Notre Dame, in a rain-soaked ring in the American League ballpark. The match went one hour, 58 minutes, five seconds, before the curfew law brought relief to 6,000 drenched spectators and the decision to Browning. Continue reading

On The Hoof

Saturday Evening Post – December 14, 1935
By Milton MacKaye

The standing of wrestling as a profit-making enterprise has received little attention in the economic journals, and even those publications devoted to the fevers of sport have been niggardly in space and headlines. There has been a general tendency to regard wrestling as a sort of little country cousin of the opulent boxing profession, a rude and primitive trial of strength persisting feebly in the backwoods sections, but destined ultimately to become as extinct as the broadsword. As a public spectacle, it has been rated just ahead of long-distance walking contests and the hop, skip, and jump, and considerably behind the breath-taking thrills and romance of puss-in-the-corner and the potato race. Continue reading