Tag Archives: Guy Brunetti

Ed Francis Main Event Mat Winner

The Calgary Herald – February 18, 1961

Gorgeous George may have been the most gorgeous guy on view during Pavilion wrestling shenanigans Friday night but he didn’t come out of the scrambling a winner.

Gentleman Ed Francis dumped the famed mat dandy in straight falls in about 25 minutes, the first on a disqualification and the second via the sleeper hold.

A near-capacity crowd watched Mighty Ursus and Dave Ruhl take a come-from-behind best-of-three fall victory over Alberto Torres and Johnny Walker in one of the two tag matches.  The Brunetti brothers, Joe and Guy, also came from behind to defeat the fiendish duo of John Smith and The Mongol.  The winning teams clash next week with the international tag crown at stake.

Eric The Red lost $50 in his forfeit challenge to pin Gino Marella within 10 minutes.  His money boosts the pot to $150 and another grappler will go after that prize next week.

It’s also likely that promoter Stu Hart will give Smith another crack at Francis in what would be a main event battle.

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Saskatoon Star-Phoenix – April 26, 1958

Guy Brunetti 4-26-58

Guy Brunetti . . . the clever operator from Salt Lake City will get a crack at Dick Hutton’s world heavyweight wrestling title at the Arena on Wednesday night.  Hutton is a former Oklahoma A and M mat star who rapidly rose to championship heights.  There will be five other bouts on the card.

Hutton Retains Laurels, Holding Thesz To Draw

Globe & Mail – August 22, 1958
By Ken McKee

Dick Hutton is still champion of Oklahoma and the National Wrestling Alliance’s world – and nothing Lou Thesz can say or do is going to change it.

Lou, who somehow manages to be the people’s cherce hereabouts as long as he isn’t facing Whipper Watson, did his best to talk Hutton into an extra five minutes of grappling last night after the main event – a one-fall affair – had been tolled to a halt by the curfew after 36 minutes of skill, science and Hutton’s canny rewrites of the NWA rule book, if there is one.

Special referee Wilbur Snyder checked with Hutton. Oklahoma’s Dick would have none of it. Snyder’s decision hadn’t been announced, and the champ was “quite sure” he had won anyhow, and couldn’t see any reason for wasting five more minutes of his valuable time.

Since the commissioner wasn’t in the house of 5,555, ring officials couldn’t waive the 11:15 p.m. curfew, so the result stood.

While the main go produced plenty of the more scientific aspects of the game, it remained for a lowly preliminary bout to bring the fans in droves to ringside, mayhem in their eyes, rotten eggs in their hands.

The cause of their ire? Ah, yes, mother, you guessed it. Gentle Gene Kiniski, as gracious and kind a character as ever graced a Charles Addams cartoon, was in against Tarzan Tourville. And in spite of the fact that Tarzan is a Montrealer, he was popular.

Kiniski spent about 10 minutes and some seconds tearing him up, and after the bout, Gentle Gene engaged in some crowd baiting, interspersed with frequent trips back to the ring where a slightly foggy Tarzan was looking for daylight.

Finally, after he had seen enough from his seat in the stands, one Whipper Billy Watson – there is only one! – came upon the scene, and without so much as mussing his hair, sent the Gentle One upon his way.

In fact, Kiniski’s braggadoccio changed to cringing fear as soon as Whipper hove into view.

The Whip, along with the Miller clan, Ed, Big Mill and their iddy, biddy brother, Dan, were on hand later to hurl challenges. It ended up this way: The Millers, any or all, will face any tag team which promoter Frank Tunney can sign for the task, and will beat them – they say.

And Watson, rarin’ to go after a hospital and recovery period of idleness, will team with Bo-Bo Brazil in a bid to lift the tag team crown off the blond heads of the Lisowski brothers in next week’s main event.

Watson also challenged the winner of the title match – but he’ll have to wait for that one, since there wasn’t a winner, and Hutton reportedly headed back to Oklahoma.

Other prelims: Guy Brunetti, 236, and Joe Brunetti, 233, defeated Lee Henning, 250, and Fred Atkins, 248. Joe Brunetti pinned Lee Henning with drop kick and top spread at 12:46 of scheduled 30-minute bout; Frenchy Vignal, 240, defeated Abe Zvonkin, 250, with airplane spin and top spread at 10:45 of scheduled 20-minute bout; Maurice Lapointe, 232, and Carl Kulaski, 238, wrestled 20 minutes to a draw.