Tag Archives: George Pencheff

Wrestling

The Sydney Morning Herald – September 25, 1934

Koloff Beats Beth.

Dan Koloff, the Bulgarian wrestler, won with two falls against Bill Beth at Rushcutter Bay Stadium last night.  The match was scheduled for eight rounds, but Koloff gained the first fall in the third round and the deciding one early in the fourth session. Continue reading

Ed (Strangler) Lewis Cleans Up Wrestling

Australian Ring Digest – August 1950

During the past month professional wrestling continued to gain in popularity throughout the world and attendance records are being shattered in all countries where the mat sport is promoted. In fact, at the present time, wrestling is in the middle of a boom that has been unsurpassed in the history of the sport. Continue reading

Hutton Is Carried Out But Retains His Title

Globe & Mail – August 15, 1958
By Rex MacLeod

Dick Hutton was freighted out of Maple Leaf Gardens ring on a stretcher last night – still the recumbent champeen of the National Wrestling Alliance and a few allied outposts.

Champeens, as a rule, don’t leave the ring in this manner, a point which was argued forcibly by challenger Lou Thesz, who had hopes of regaining the title he had held for many years.

But referee Bert Maxwell, a portly chappie who is devoid of sentiment, declined to indulge in any bandinage. He disqualified Thesz after 24 minutes and two seconds of highly skillful grappling.

Naturally there was an uproar among the crowd of 6,002. Many thought that Thesz had won legitimately. A few expressed concern about the motionless Hutton and a few others thought that Maxwell had lost a few more marbles.

The end, to coin a phrase, came unexpectedly although Thesz, seemingly enraged by Maxwell’s peculiar concept of justice, had been growing more angry by the second. And when Thesz gets angry he grows muscles on his muscles.

In one moment of fury he hurled Hutton, a mere 250 pounds, out of the ring to the cement floor. Hutton, the fool, tried to climb back into the ring but Thesz drop-kicked him back to the cement.

Hutton arose groggily and once more tried to get back. Again Thesz went airborne to launch a drop kick but this time Maxwell somehow got in the prohibited area. He took the full impact of Thesz’ drop kick on one of his chins and fell flopping like a beached porpoise on the ring apron.

Hutton, meanwhile, had climbed wearily through the ropes, a reckless manoeuver. Thesz hoisted him aloft, aimed carefully and slammed him all over the canvas.

Thesz was perched on the comatose Hutton when Maxwell reeled back into the ring and clapped Thesz on the back. Numerous fans thought that Maxwell was proclaiming Thesz the winner. There was some jubilation but it was short-lived. Maxwell was merely informing everyone that Thesz had been disqualified.

Naturally Thesz protested. He gesticulated wildly, even threatened to punch Maxwell. He pleaded that he had not kicked Maxwell intentionally but the referee ignored him.

Hutton was examined briefly in the ring by a doctor before he was borne away to the dressing room. It was announced later that he did not suffer any ill effects.

The gigantic Miller brothers, Ed and Bill, won their tag team match in the semi-final by defeating Athol Layton and George Pencheff. Ed Miller subdued Pencheff with an expanding back-breaker at 23:42. Seconds before the playful Millers had played wishbone with the exhausted Pencheff.

In other exhibitions of skill and science Tarzan Tourville dispatched Tiger Tasker with a series of drop kicks, fancy Frenchy Vignal stopped Al Korman with an airplane spin and spread, and Wilbur Snyder won by disqualification over Dan Miller, younger member of the rowdy clan.

Matmen Thrown For Loss On Coast

N.Y. Daily Mirror – April 28, 1939
By Dan Parker

Some people have no sense of humor. Out on the Coast, a lot of legislators in Sacramento are trying to prove wrestling isn’t on the level.

Everyone with common sense knows it is because Promoter Ray Fabiani and Larse McCurley of Philadelphia and Boxing Commissioner Stanley Scheer of Baltimore say it is.

Their word is good enough for me. Besides, if it wasn’t on the level, how could I have predicted that draw in Cleveland Wednesday night between the Great Evans and Bull Komar? Or foreseen tonight’s victory of the Golden Tanker over Hans Steinke in Philadelphia, after King Kong has thrown Nanjo Singh.

Of course it’s on the level, which is why Dzimmie Londos has been signed up for a return bout with Joe Savoldi in Louisville on Derby eve.

Another feather, making 6,732 in all, was added to my hat Wednesday night when, in one of the most astounding upsets of the century, Londos threw Chief Chewacki Trenton. The only mistake he made was in not throwing him into the Delaware River and putting an end to this tiresome serial that dates back to the early days of “The Perils of Pauline.”

On the same card, George Pencheff, Londos’ protege, threw Maurice LaChapelle for the second night in succession. But the issue is still in doubt and they will engage in many a return match before Pencheff is proclaimed the better man.

Shadows are falling all over the wrestling map, in addition to those cast in the Sacramento investigations. There’s a Red Shadow in Montreal and for the information of the natives, he’s the old tanker, Leo Numa, who was the Black Mask in Boston. Leo’s glad to be out of the black and into the red.

Cleveland’s Purple Shadow is Bill Longson, whose back is still calloused from all the dives he took for fifth-raters during his wrestling career. The Purple Shadow left San Francisco recently one hop, skip and a jump ahead of Vigilance Committee.

In the Sacramento investigation, being conducted by the California State Legislature, R.H. (Tommy) Thompson, a former wrestler, testified under oath that practically all wrestling bouts of which he has had any knowledge were fixed and that wrestlers who didn’t obey orders had to get out. Referees had to let wrestlers manhandle them as part of the show, he said.

Thompson chirped his biggest mouthful when he told the investigating committee that from Coast to Coast, he doesn’t know of a single heavyweight wrestler who can’t beat Man Mountain Dean, despite Man Mountain’s long string of victories. This expert fearlessly picks Dzimmie Londos to beat Man Mountain Dean when and if they meet again.