Tag Archives: Chief Chewacki

Riot Averted As Savoldi Pins Terror

Washington Post – November 25, 1938
By Lewis F. Atchison

Ham, rather than the customary gobbler, was the holiday offering at Turner’s Arena last night when a 305-pound specimen, the Golden Terror, succumbed to a series of punishing dropkicks authored by swarthy Joe Savoldi. Continue reading

Nagurski Wins Over Joe Savoldi

Washington Post – November 11, 1938
By Lewis F. Atchison

Coming events did a little shadow-casting before, perhaps, last night in the brightly lighted battlepit at Turner’s Arena where Minnesota tossed Notre Dame for a goal in the feature wrestling bout. What with the Gophers and Irish meeting on the gridiron tomorrow, last night’s finish may have been an omen. Continue reading

Brazil, Layton Win Arena Tag Team Bout

Toledo Blade – December 10, 1959

Bobo Brazil and Lord Layton won the final two falls in their tag team match to defeat Fritz and Waldo Von Erich in the headliner on the professional wrestling card last night before about 1,800 fans in the Sports Arena.

In other bouts, Mike Valentino defeated Lee Henning in 14 minutes, Don Lewin and Roughhouse Haggerty battled to a 20 minutes draw and Ilio DiPalo bested Chief Cheweke in 16 minutes.

Charley Santen Downs Dean Detton

Los Angeles Times – March 31, 1933

In one of those dramatic finishes in which the hero not only crawls off the track in the nick of time, but throws the engine into the villain’s face, Charley Santen, rosy-cheeked Missouri bone-bender, took two out of three falls from Dean Detton, invading mat menace, to win last night’s main event at the Hollywood Legion Stadium.

Detton, a rough, tough young man, won the first fall in 18m. 41s. with a body scissors after punishing Santen with numerous enthusiastic flying tackles. Santen took the second fall in 9m. 15s. with a body slam.

Detton had Santen groggy from two flying tackles and was all ready to unleash a third one when Charley suddenly came to life, leaped high in the air and wrapped his shapely limbs about Dean’s lowered head. The resultant head scissors and accompanying disappointment so lowered Mr. Detton’s resistance that he succumbed to the deciding fall in 10m. 18s.

Less than 2,000 fans saw the match, so the rasslers got the show over in record early time for Hollywood.

Hal Rumberg tossed Lavosca (Billy) Severe twice within the brief space of nine minutes, each time with a flying body hold. The first fall came in 6 minutes and 13 seconds, the second in 2 minutes and 29 seconds.

Dan Koloff, the Bulgarian Lion, or something, trussed up the toe of Prince Chewchki (Chewacki) and made the red man say “Uncle” or whatever it is Indians say when they are ready to give up the ghost. It all happened after 13 minutes and 31 seconds.

Sailor Jack Lewis made the mistake of getting too brutal with Count Harkowski (the gob should have known better than to monkey with one of the mat game’s noblemen) and was disqualified after 6 minutes and 12 seconds of so-called “rasslin.” The navy man then took on the gallery for an unadvertised bout and was said to have won this decision.

Myron Cox threw Buddy O’Brien in the opener, using what was referred to as a spread-eagle hold. The end came after 11 minutes and 15 seconds.

Matmen Thrown For Loss On Coast

N.Y. Daily Mirror – April 28, 1939
By Dan Parker

Some people have no sense of humor. Out on the Coast, a lot of legislators in Sacramento are trying to prove wrestling isn’t on the level.

Everyone with common sense knows it is because Promoter Ray Fabiani and Larse McCurley of Philadelphia and Boxing Commissioner Stanley Scheer of Baltimore say it is.

Their word is good enough for me. Besides, if it wasn’t on the level, how could I have predicted that draw in Cleveland Wednesday night between the Great Evans and Bull Komar? Or foreseen tonight’s victory of the Golden Tanker over Hans Steinke in Philadelphia, after King Kong has thrown Nanjo Singh.

Of course it’s on the level, which is why Dzimmie Londos has been signed up for a return bout with Joe Savoldi in Louisville on Derby eve.

Another feather, making 6,732 in all, was added to my hat Wednesday night when, in one of the most astounding upsets of the century, Londos threw Chief Chewacki Trenton. The only mistake he made was in not throwing him into the Delaware River and putting an end to this tiresome serial that dates back to the early days of “The Perils of Pauline.”

On the same card, George Pencheff, Londos’ protege, threw Maurice LaChapelle for the second night in succession. But the issue is still in doubt and they will engage in many a return match before Pencheff is proclaimed the better man.

Shadows are falling all over the wrestling map, in addition to those cast in the Sacramento investigations. There’s a Red Shadow in Montreal and for the information of the natives, he’s the old tanker, Leo Numa, who was the Black Mask in Boston. Leo’s glad to be out of the black and into the red.

Cleveland’s Purple Shadow is Bill Longson, whose back is still calloused from all the dives he took for fifth-raters during his wrestling career. The Purple Shadow left San Francisco recently one hop, skip and a jump ahead of Vigilance Committee.

In the Sacramento investigation, being conducted by the California State Legislature, R.H. (Tommy) Thompson, a former wrestler, testified under oath that practically all wrestling bouts of which he has had any knowledge were fixed and that wrestlers who didn’t obey orders had to get out. Referees had to let wrestlers manhandle them as part of the show, he said.

Thompson chirped his biggest mouthful when he told the investigating committee that from Coast to Coast, he doesn’t know of a single heavyweight wrestler who can’t beat Man Mountain Dean, despite Man Mountain’s long string of victories. This expert fearlessly picks Dzimmie Londos to beat Man Mountain Dean when and if they meet again.