Tag Archives: Bill Miller

Billy Muldoon The Apollo

The Williamsport Sunday Grit – January 6, 1889

There are fifteen or twenty prominent professional wrestlers now before the public, but there are not more than a half dozen of them that have much more than a living out of their profession. H.M. Dufur, the collar-and-elbow wrestler, is probably the richest man in the business. He lives at Marlboro, Mass., where he has an elegant home, with plenty of good, paying property. Dufur is worth $50,000. He did not earn it on the mattress, but acquired it by inheritance. William Muldoon, the solid man and the Apollo Belvedere of all wrestlers, probably comes next on the list. Twelve years ago handsome Billy carried a club and paraded as one of the special squad of Broadway “collars.” Muldoon has been a big drawing card ever since he started out as a wrestler. He is also known in the profession as a cold man, and has put a hammer-lock on every dollar that has fallen into his possession. He owns a good farm near Belfast, N.Y., and has besides about $15,000 in other investments. Muldoon would have been better off but for the failure of the Marine Bank in which he was loser to the extent of $16,000. Tom Cannon, the English wrestler, who now makes Cincinnati his home, is one of the “savers” of the business. No better hustler ever lived than this same Cannon, and no one likes “beans,” as he calls money, better than he does. Tom will go to any point for a match, no matter when, if he sees a chance for turning a dollar. He was worth about $5,000 in 1885, but his trip to Australia helped him greatly. He made no less than $11,000 in the antipodes, and returned with about $7,000 of it. Besides Tom married well, his wife being a prospective heir to a farm worth about $15,000. Duncan C. Ross, the Scotch athlete and wrestler, has probably earned more money than all the rest of the wrestlers put together. He is the best jobber and hippodromer in the business, and he works skin matches so well as to always have a good “gate.” Ross is a great “spender,” however. He lets his wealth go with the prodigality of a drunken sailor. Nothing is too good for the Scotch athlete or his friends. For all that, Duncan is not a pauper by any means. He is worth $20,000 or $25,000 and, like Cannon, has been all over the world. Professor Miller is also well to do. He is worth at least $20,000, but he received it from his father’s estate. Joe Acton, “the little demon,” who for years stood head and shoulders above any catch-as-catch-can man in the country, is not worth a dollar. Joe is indolent and a poor business man. He has always had some one to manage his affairs, and is not a good hustler. He is also an intemperate man.

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Eagle Meets Longson On Mat Tonight

Chicago Tribune – October 15, 1954

A triple feature wrestling show will be presented in Rainbo Arena tonight with six outstanding performers as principals. These are Chief Don Eagle, Ruffy Silverstein, Bill Miller, The Great Karpozilos, Sonny Myers, and Wild Bill Longson. Continue reading

Gibson Faces Thesz Tonight For Mat Title

Chicago Tribune – August 18, 1954

Lou Thesz will defend his world heavyweight wrestling championship for the 10th time this year when he faces Stu Gibson of Louisville on promoter Leon Schwartz’s card in Rainbo Arena, 4836 N. Clark St. Gibson has lost only four times in over 400 mat bouts. Continue reading

Miller Poses No Problem To Kowalski

Montreal Gazette – December 29, 1955

It’s two down and the rest of the field to go for giant Wladek Kowalski today. Last night, the big fella took the measure of Big Bill Miller in another bruising encounter that had the holiday crowd yipping throughout the three falls. Continue reading

Tripping Helps Masked Terror

Indianapolis Star – July 24, 1963

The Masked Terror beat The Sheik in the feature event of the Armory’s pro wrestling program last night.

The Terror’s manager, Tony Angelo, tripped the Sheik, enabling The Terror to pin him. Continue reading

Terror, Sheik In Mat Feature

Indianapolis Star – July 22, 1963

The Masked Terror, who in many of his past victories has been aided by his manager, Tony Angelo, may have to face the Sheik in the feature event of Tuesday’s pro wrestling program at the Armory without Angelo in his corner. Continue reading

Robert Wins Mat Feature, Miller Gets Thumb

Ottawa Citizen – April 27, 1955
By Bernie Nellis

Either referee Sammy McConnell is a nemesis to Big Bill Miller, or Miller just doesn’t like McConnell. Continue reading

Hutton Is Carried Out But Retains His Title

Globe & Mail – August 15, 1958
By Rex MacLeod

Dick Hutton was freighted out of Maple Leaf Gardens ring on a stretcher last night – still the recumbent champeen of the National Wrestling Alliance and a few allied outposts.

Champeens, as a rule, don’t leave the ring in this manner, a point which was argued forcibly by challenger Lou Thesz, who had hopes of regaining the title he had held for many years.

But referee Bert Maxwell, a portly chappie who is devoid of sentiment, declined to indulge in any bandinage. He disqualified Thesz after 24 minutes and two seconds of highly skillful grappling.

Naturally there was an uproar among the crowd of 6,002. Many thought that Thesz had won legitimately. A few expressed concern about the motionless Hutton and a few others thought that Maxwell had lost a few more marbles.

The end, to coin a phrase, came unexpectedly although Thesz, seemingly enraged by Maxwell’s peculiar concept of justice, had been growing more angry by the second. And when Thesz gets angry he grows muscles on his muscles.

In one moment of fury he hurled Hutton, a mere 250 pounds, out of the ring to the cement floor. Hutton, the fool, tried to climb back into the ring but Thesz drop-kicked him back to the cement.

Hutton arose groggily and once more tried to get back. Again Thesz went airborne to launch a drop kick but this time Maxwell somehow got in the prohibited area. He took the full impact of Thesz’ drop kick on one of his chins and fell flopping like a beached porpoise on the ring apron.

Hutton, meanwhile, had climbed wearily through the ropes, a reckless manoeuver. Thesz hoisted him aloft, aimed carefully and slammed him all over the canvas.

Thesz was perched on the comatose Hutton when Maxwell reeled back into the ring and clapped Thesz on the back. Numerous fans thought that Maxwell was proclaiming Thesz the winner. There was some jubilation but it was short-lived. Maxwell was merely informing everyone that Thesz had been disqualified.

Naturally Thesz protested. He gesticulated wildly, even threatened to punch Maxwell. He pleaded that he had not kicked Maxwell intentionally but the referee ignored him.

Hutton was examined briefly in the ring by a doctor before he was borne away to the dressing room. It was announced later that he did not suffer any ill effects.

The gigantic Miller brothers, Ed and Bill, won their tag team match in the semi-final by defeating Athol Layton and George Pencheff. Ed Miller subdued Pencheff with an expanding back-breaker at 23:42. Seconds before the playful Millers had played wishbone with the exhausted Pencheff.

In other exhibitions of skill and science Tarzan Tourville dispatched Tiger Tasker with a series of drop kicks, fancy Frenchy Vignal stopped Al Korman with an airplane spin and spread, and Wilbur Snyder won by disqualification over Dan Miller, younger member of the rowdy clan.

Kim Battles Thesz For Mat Title Tonight

Chicago Tribune – July 16, 1954

Lou Thesz of St. Louis will defend his world heavyweight wrestling crown against Lu Kim of Manchuria in a two out of three fall, 60-minute bout in Rainbo Arena tonight.

Thesz, unbeaten since winning the title from Wild Bill Longson in 1948, will have Ed (Strangler) Lewis as an advisor in his corner. Kim has a reputation of ignoring the rules once inside the ropes.

Big Bill Miller, who hails from Ohio, and Andre Drapp of France will meet in a rematch on the same program.

Kim ‘Holds,’ So Thesz Holds Title

Chicago Tribune – July 17, 1954

Lou Thesz continued as one of the world’s heavyweight wrestling champions last night, but not until his Rainbo Arena match with dreadful Lu Kim had gone to the last page, and most exciting part, of the script.

The score in falls was tied at one each and almost 3,000 fans thought they were about to witness wrestling’s greatest upset, when Kim got a terrifying hold on Thesz.

But, alas! The hold was illegal. Kim was disqualified and Thesz was proclaimed winner and still champion. Thesz had taken the first fall in 13:21 with a body press. Kim came back to win the second with a full Nelson in 5:20.

A disqualification also settled the semi-windup between Andre Drapp and Big Bill Miller. Miller won the first fall with a back breaker in 12:50 and Andre squared things with a drop kick at 6:40.

After another 5:10 of wrestling, Miller threw Drapp from the ring. This pitch is as illegal as the spitball and Miller was disqualified. Other results:

The Great Karpozilos beat Bobby Nelson, one fall; Cyclone Anaya beat Mike Lane, one fall; Ivan Rasputin and Bob Orton beat Juan Hernandez and Maurice Roberre, two falls (tag match).

The Great Karpozilos