Category Archives: 1886

Carkeek Wins A Match

Daily Alta California – April 19, 1886

GRASS VALLEY, April 18th. – The Cornish wrestling match between Jack Carkeek, the champion, and Durham Ivey, who claims to be the champion of Colorado, was decided last night in Empire Hall, before a large crowd.  The match was for $100 a side and the gate receipts.  Ivey weighs about twenty pounds less than Carkeek, but showed no backwardness in going to work.  He was thrown violently three times before a fall was won by Carkeek, who finally threw him flat on his back.  They had but one bout for the second fall, when Ivey, who had received another heavy fall, gave up the match, acknowledging that he was no match for Carkeek.

Noted Wrestlers

Omaha Daily Republican – June 29, 1886

Greek George and Antoine Pierre Behind the Bars.

Two well known wrestlers, Greek George and Antoine Pierre, are prisoners in the central station awaiting the arrival of Denver officers, at whose instance the men were arrested Sunday morning as they stepped from an incoming Denver train. Continue reading

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Otago Witness – September 3, 1886

The catch-as-catch-can wrestling match between Tom Cannon and Evan Lewis, the strangler, took place at the Grand Opera House, Cincinatti, July 15, before a good house.  The match was for 250dol a side.  Cannon was looked after by Billy Gale and Lewis by “Parson” Davies.  It was exactly 9.18 when the men shook hands and went to work.  They moved around cat-like for a few moments, when Lewis secured his favourite hold – the hang.  Cannon, by good generalship, grabbed Lewis around the waist and rolled him off the mattress.  The referee ordered them back, Cannon taking the same hold.  They squirmed around for a second.  Finally Cannon secured a half Nelson and an arm-lock, putting Lewis flat on his back.  Time, 2min.  After a rest of fifteen minutes the men went to work again, Cannon it could be seen, was afraid of Lewis’ terrible hang-hold and fought shy of it.  Cannon finally secured a leg-hold and rushed Lewis back again.  Lewis at last got his hang-hold on Cannon.  Tom turned red in the face, but by good headwork grabbed Lewis around the back, pulling both of his shoulders down; time, 4min.  In all it was one of the fiercest things of its kind ever held in that city.

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Otago Witness – August 6, 1886

William Muldoon tried to throw Evan Lewis, “The Strangler,” twice at Graeco-Roman wrestling inside of an hour, at Minneapolis, Minn., on May 28.  He failed to accomplish the feat.  Muldoon had reduced his weight and tipped the beam at 207 pounds, while Lewis weighed 28 pounds less.  The men went at it at twenty minutes past nine o’clock.  Lewis acted entirely on the defensive.  The match was brought to a close after they had wrestled 45 minutes.  Lewis got a body hold on Muldoon, who went to the floor, and in dropping threw Lewis over his shoulders.  Lewis attempted to trip him, but he failed.  Muldoon retired to his room, and then sent out Mr Hilton to make the announcement that he would not try another fall.  One thousand people paid 1dol apiece to see the match.

The Muldoon-Cannon Graeco-Roman wrestling match at the Grand Opera House, Cincinnati, June 17, ended in a draw.  Muldoon gained the first fall in 35min, and Cannon the second in 8min.  They then wrestled 56min without success, and the referee declared the match a draw.  2500 people witnessed the struggle.

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Otago Witness – April 17, 1886

The “catch-as-catch-can wrestling match between Matsada Sorakichi, the Japanese, and Evan Lewis, appropriately named “The Strangler,” took place at Central Music Hall, Chicago (Ill.), on February 15. The hall was crowded, and when the wrestlers faced each other for the first bout 3000 people cheered them. After a couple of unsuccessful manoeuvres on both sides, Lewis got the Japanese on his stomach, and placing his knee on the calf of the Jap’s leg seized his foot with both hands and began bending the foot in such a manner as to wrench the ankle out of the socket. A shout of indignation rose from the crowd at this inhuman treatment. The Jap., compelled by the pain to give in, was turned over on his back, and lay there unable to rise to his feet, and was carried off the stage in the arms of his trainer, Edwin Bibby. The referee (Mr Palmer) awarded the match to Lewis. Lewis appears to have no science, and relies solely on his superior weight and brute force to carry his point. Though no bone is fractured, one of the chords of the Jap.’s leg is broken, and all the muscles are so strained and twisted that Sorakichi is more badly hurt than if the limb had been actually broken. He will not be able to use the limb for some weeks.

Evan Lewis, who in the match with Matsada Sorakichi, at Chicago, disabled the Japanese wrestler, appeared on February 23 at the Olympic Theatre, Chicago, in an exhibition wrestling match with Edwin Bibby. The immense audience greeted the introduction of Lewis with groans and hisses, calling on Bibby to “break his leg.” Lewis bore the hissing calmly. When he threw Bibby the hissing was renewed. After the performance Lewis said to Charles E. Davis that time would change public opinion, and that lovers of sport would at least give him credit for being honest in his matches and doing his utmost to win in accordance with the rules under which he was contesting.

The Strangler Throws Bibby

The New York Times – February 24, 1886

CHICAGO, Feb. 23.–Evan Lewis, “the Strangler,” who in the recent match with Sorakichi disabled the Japanese wrestler, appeared last night at the Olympic Theatre in an exhibition wrestling match with Edwin Bibby.  The immense audience greeted the introduction of Lewis with groans and hisses, calling on Bibby to “break his leg.”  Lewis bore his reception calmly. When he threw Bibby the hissing was renewed. After the performance Lewis said to Charles E. Davis that time would change public opinion and that lovers of sport would at least give him credit for being honest In his matches and doing his utmost to win in accordance with the rules under which he was contesting.

Sorakichi’s Leg Broken

The New York Times – February 16, 1886

CHICAGO, Feb. 15. – The catch-as-catch-can wrestling match to-night, under the management of Parson Davies, between Evan Lewis, of Madison, Wis., and Matsada Sorakichi, the Japanese, was decided in less than one minute.  Scarcely had the wrestlers shaken hands when the two were rolling each other about on the floor, and Lewis, seizing Sorakichi’s left leg, bent it over his own by main strength, until the Jap’s limb was dislocated.  Lewis was awarded the match, and was hissed and cursed without stint.  Over 300 people were present.