Billy Muldoon The Apollo

The Williamsport Sunday Grit – January 6, 1889

There are fifteen or twenty prominent professional wrestlers now before the public, but there are not more than a half dozen of them that have much more than a living out of their profession. H.M. Dufur, the collar-and-elbow wrestler, is probably the richest man in the business. He lives at Marlboro, Mass., where he has an elegant home, with plenty of good, paying property. Dufur is worth $50,000. He did not earn it on the mattress, but acquired it by inheritance. William Muldoon, the solid man and the Apollo Belvedere of all wrestlers, probably comes next on the list. Twelve years ago handsome Billy carried a club and paraded as one of the special squad of Broadway “collars.” Muldoon has been a big drawing card ever since he started out as a wrestler. He is also known in the profession as a cold man, and has put a hammer-lock on every dollar that has fallen into his possession. He owns a good farm near Belfast, N.Y., and has besides about $15,000 in other investments. Muldoon would have been better off but for the failure of the Marine Bank in which he was loser to the extent of $16,000. Tom Cannon, the English wrestler, who now makes Cincinnati his home, is one of the “savers” of the business. No better hustler ever lived than this same Cannon, and no one likes “beans,” as he calls money, better than he does. Tom will go to any point for a match, no matter when, if he sees a chance for turning a dollar. He was worth about $5,000 in 1885, but his trip to Australia helped him greatly. He made no less than $11,000 in the antipodes, and returned with about $7,000 of it. Besides Tom married well, his wife being a prospective heir to a farm worth about $15,000. Duncan C. Ross, the Scotch athlete and wrestler, has probably earned more money than all the rest of the wrestlers put together. He is the best jobber and hippodromer in the business, and he works skin matches so well as to always have a good “gate.” Ross is a great “spender,” however. He lets his wealth go with the prodigality of a drunken sailor. Nothing is too good for the Scotch athlete or his friends. For all that, Duncan is not a pauper by any means. He is worth $20,000 or $25,000 and, like Cannon, has been all over the world. Professor Miller is also well to do. He is worth at least $20,000, but he received it from his father’s estate. Joe Acton, “the little demon,” who for years stood head and shoulders above any catch-as-catch-can man in the country, is not worth a dollar. Joe is indolent and a poor business man. He has always had some one to manage his affairs, and is not a good hustler. He is also an intemperate man.

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